Job & Family Services Office of Child Support
Office of Child Support - Frequently Asked Questions

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Child Support Case Questions & Answers:

If I want to give my written permission to authorize someone access to my case information, what information must be provided?

The written authorization for release of information must include all of the following:

  • Your full name.
  • What information you are authorizing for release.
  • The full name of the person or agency that may release the information (for example, 
    Franklin County Child Support Enforcement Agency").
  • The full name of the person that the information may be released to.
  • The reason for the release of information.
  • When the authorization for release of information will end (for example, "12 months from  
    today").
  • Your signature.
  • Your legal guardian's or authorized representative's signature, if you have one.
  • The signature of the person or agency representative that may release the information.
  • The date the form is signed.

Can I have my case transferred to the county I now live in?

Your case may be eligible to be transferred to a child support enforcement agency (CSEA) in another county, depending on specific facts and circumstances. Ohio Administrative Code rule 5101:12-10-03 specifies when a CSEA may transfer a case to a CSEA in another county. To find out if your case may be transferred, contact your current CSEA.

What are administrative processing charges?

Administrative processing charges, sometimes called administrative fees, are monies an obligor owes to the child support enforcement agency to cover the cost of processing the obligor's support payments. The processing charge amount is two percent of the support obligation amount, so the charge is not the same amount for all cases. 

I disagree with actions being taken on my case. Is there anything I can do?

Yes, when you disagree with the action that the child support enforcement agency is taking on your case, you may request a state hearing. 

How do I request a state hearing?

To request a state hearing, you must complete the "State Hearing Request" (JFS 04069) and submit it to the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services. 

On what grounds may a custodial parent request a state hearing?

Per Ohio Administrative Code (rule 5101:6-3-01), a custodial parent may request a state hearing for any of the following reasons:

  • An application for child support services has been denied, acted upon erroneously, or not acted upon with reasonable promptness.
  • A recipient of child support services believes the case has been acted upon erroneously, or not acted upon with reasonable promptness.
  • The recipient believes that the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) has failed to use appropriate establishment or enforcement techniques.
  • The obligee believes that child support collections have not been distributed or disbursed correctly or questions the accuracy of the arrears owed to ODJFS at termination of Ohio Works First benefits.
  • The obligee believes that child support payments, including payments owed to the custodial parent due to agency error, are not being issued with reasonable promptness.
  • The obligee believes that the CSEA has failed to take action against an obligor's employer for failure to promptly forward payments withheld from the obligor's wages.
  • The obligee disagrees with the results of an investigation concerning termination of a support order.
  • The custodial parent disagrees with the CSEA's decision to close the child support case.

On what grounds may a non-custodial parent request a state hearing?

Per Ohio Administrative Code (rule 5101:6-3-01), a non-custodial parent may request a state hearing for any of the following reasons:

  • Services for establishing paternity have been denied.
  • The child support enforcement agency has refused to review the support order for modification.
  • The obligor disagrees with the results of an investigation concerning termination of a support order.

Do I need an attorney to have a case with the child support enforcement agency (CSEA)?

No, you can receive child support services without hiring a private attorney. If you do have an attorney, you just need to tell your local CSEA and keep them up-to-date on any actions you or your attorney file with the court. 

I have been notified that my public assistance benefits may be sanctioned due to my non-cooperation with the child support enforcement agency (CSEA). What kind of behavior is considered "non-cooperation"?

The types of activities that are considered "non-cooperation" and may lead to your public assistance benefits being sanctioned include:

  • Not showing up at interviews, hearings, or legal proceedings.
  • Not providing information regarding the identity of the child's non-custodial parent(s), including name, social security number, and current address, and not completing a "lack of information statement, "stating you do not have information on the
  • non-custodial parent(s) and the reason why you do not have any information.
  • Not submitting to or not having your child submit to genetic testing.
  • Not completing and returning all forms sent to you by the CSEA.
  • Not providing any additional information that the CSEA needs to establish paternity or to establish and enforce a support order.

I would like to apply for child support services. Is there a way to protect my information from the other party?

If you are concerned that giving your information to the other party could lead to family violence, you need to report this to the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) and request that your case is marked with a "family violence indicator." The CSEA will tell you what type of documentation you need to provide (for example, a copy of a protection order or written statement from a social worker). When a case is marked with the family violence indicator, none of the child's or the adult's personal information, such as date of birth, social security number or address, is disclosed to the other adult party. The CSEA can still work the case and obtain child support, while protecting the case participants' personal information. 

I am applying for public assistance and know I will need to cooperate with child support, but I am afraid the other parent will hurt me or my kids if I tell my caseworker who the other parent is and where the other parent lives. What should I do?

If you are receiving Ohio Works First or Medicaid and have a requirement to cooperate with the child support enforcement agency (CSEA), you have two options. The first option is to request that your child support case is marked with a "family violence indicator." When a case is marked with the family violence indicator, none of the child's or the adult's personal information, such as date of birth, social security number or address, is disclosed to the other adult party during the child support process. The CSEA can still work the case and obtain child support, while protecting the case participants' personal information. The second option is to request a "good cause waiver." The CSEA may issue a good cause waiver after determining your cooperation with the CSEA is not in your child's best interest or would make it more difficult for you or your child to escape from domestic violence. Copies of police reports, court records, and restraining orders are examples of records that the CSEA will need to mark your case with a family violence indicator or to issue a "good cause waiver." Contact your CSEA if you want to request a family violence indicator for your case and/or want to apply for a good cause waiver.

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Case Intake Questions & Answers:

Who can request child support services?

Anyone may request child support services by completing an "Application for Child Support Services" (JFS 07076) and submitting it to the local child support enforcement agency. 

What types of services are provided by the child support enforcement agency?

The types of services provided are:

  • Location of non-custodial parents.
  • Paternity establishment.
  • Establishment and enforcement of child support orders, including medical support.
  • Collection and disbursement of support.
  • Review and modification of support orders.

What types of services are not provided by the child support enforcement agency?

The types of services not provided are:

  • Visitation.
  • Custody.
  • Divorce.
  • Establishment, review, and modification of spousal support orders (alimony).

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Locate Questions & Answers:

Can the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) help me find the father of my child?

Yes, the CSEA can help find the physical location of the non-custodial parent and the CSEA can help identify if the non-custodial parent has an employer, or other sources of income and assets, so the next steps to establish or enforce a child support order can be taken.

Multiple sources are used to locate non-custodial parents, their employment information, and their financial resources, including:

  • Information from the custodial parents.
  • Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles.
  • United States Postal Service.
  • Child Support Enforcement Network (CSENet).
  • Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS), Office of Unemployment 
    Compensation.
  • ODJFS Office of Child Support, Interstate Central Registry.
  • Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation.
  • Ohio Department of Health, Bureau of Vital Statistics.
  • Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction.
  • Credit Bureaus.
  • Internet Search Engines.
  • Federal Parent Locator Service.
  • Ohio New Hire Employer Directory.

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Paternity Establishment Questions and Answers: 

What is paternity establishment?

The administrative or court determination that a specific male is the legal father of a child. 

What are the benefits of establishing fatherhood (paternity) or motherhood (maternity)?

Establishing parenthood may provide legal, emotional, social, and economic ties between a parent and child. Establishing parenthood should make it easier for a child to find out about medical problems that may run in the family. Establishing parenthood makes it easier for the child to qualify as a dependent for the parent's disability, retirement, or veteran's benefits, or for an inheritance as next-of-kin if the parent dies. In addition, paternity must be established in order to establish a child support order. 

If I establish paternity for my child does that automatically give the father visitation rights?

No, visitation is a separate matter and is handled by the court. 

What is an Acknowledgment of Paternity Affidavit?

The "Acknowledgement of Paternity Affidavit" (JFS 07038) is a form that both parents can sign to establish paternity when the child is born out of wedlock. 

How can I get a blank Acknowledgment of Paternity Affidavit?

You can get an "Acknowledgement of Paternity Affidavit" (JFS 07038) at most birthing hospitals, any county child support enforcement agency, or from the Ohio Department of Health. 

What do I do if I have completed the Acknowledgment of Paternity Affidavit but I now think I am not the child's father?

As long as the "Acknowledgment of Paternity Affidavit" was sent to the Central Paternity Registry (CPR) less than 60 days ago, you can rescind the acknowledgment. You have to contact the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) that is located in the county that the child's mom lives in and tell them that you want to a rescission. If it has been more than 60 days since the completed affidavit was sent to CPR, the affidavit is now final and you will have to seek legal advice. 

How do I change the name of the father on the child's birth certificate?

If the name of the father needs changed on the birth certificate because the "Acknowledgement of Paternity Affidavit" becomes final and enforceable, the Central Paternity Registry (CPR) will notify the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) and ODH will change the birth certificate. If the name of the father needs changed on the birth certificate because of genetic testing results and the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) ordered the genetic testing, the CSEA will notify the Central Paternity Registry (CPR). CPR will notify the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) and ODH will change the birth certificate. If the name of the father needs changed on the birth certificate because the court determined paternity or for another reason, you will need to seek legal advice on how to get the birth certificate changed. The CSEA is not authorized to help you in these situations. 

How do I change the name of the child on the child's birth certificate?

If both parents want to change the last name of the child on the birth certificate because of genetic testing results and the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) ordered the genetic testing, the CSEA will notify the Central Paternity Registry (CPR) that the last name of the child needs to be changed on the birth certificate. CPR will notify the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) of the child's new last name and ODH will change the birth certificate. The CSEA can only do this when both parents agree to change the child's last name, and the CSEA is not authorized to make any changes to the child's first name or middle name.

If both parents want to change the last name of the child on the birth certificate and the parents are signing an Acknowledgement of Paternity Affidavit, the parents must write the child's new last name on the affidavit.

If the name of the child on the birth certificate needs changed based on a court order, because you just want your child's name changed, or because you want to change your child's first name or middle name, you will need to seek legal advice on how to get the birth certificate changed. The CSEA is not authorized to help you in these situations. 

What happens if the child's alleged father did not sign the paternity affidavit and refuses to submit to genetic testing?

The court process may be used when the alleged father did not sign the paternity affidavit and refuses to cooperate with genetic testing ordered by the child support enforcement agency. If the alleged father does not cooperate with the court process, the court may establish paternity by issuing a default judgment. 

What if the child's father denies he is the father, or says he's not sure?

Either parent can ask the child support enforcement agency to conduct genetic testing. 

If genetic testing is ordered, who pays for it?

When genetic testing hasn't been previously performed and is ordered by the child support enforcement agency (CSEA), it is paid for by the CSEA. When the court orders genetic testing, the court may order the person that requested the genetic testing to pay for it. However, a custodial parent that receives Ohio Works First benefits will not be ordered to pay for genetic testing and a non-custodial parent that is found to be indigent will not be ordered to pay for genetic testing. 

What happens if I am not sure who the father is?

The child support enforcement agency will pursue the male that you provide the most information on first so that he can either be identified as the father or excluded through genetic testing. 

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Support Establishment Questions and Answers: 

When does the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) establish an administrative child support order?

The CSEA establishes an administrative child support order when the CSEA has just issued an administrative paternity establishment order; when an "Acknowledgement of Paternity Affidavit" is final and one of the parents asked the CSEA to establish an administrative child support order; or when there is a presumption of paternity and the CSEA receives a request to establish an administrative child support order. 

When does the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) file with the court for the court to establish a court support order?

The CSEA files with the court for the court to establish a court support order when the court is already involved (for example, there is a pending custody hearing or the child is adopted); the CSEA issued an administrative paternity establishment order but it wasn't recently; an "Acknowledgement of Paternity Affidavit" is final but neither of the parents asked the CSEA to establish an administrative child support order; the non-custodial parent is the mother; or the child was conceived by artificial insemination. 

What is the process to establish an administrative child support order?

Paternity must be established before the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) can establish an administrative child support order. When paternity is established, the CSEA notifies both parties of the date, time, and location of the support establishment hearing, and tells both parties what documents they need to bring with them to the hearing (for example, pay stubs, tax returns, and verification of any available health insurance coverage). At the support establishment hearing, the administrative officer listens to any sworn testimony and completes the guidelines to determine the amount of child support and cash medical support that the non-custodial parent (obligor) will be ordered to pay, and to determine who will be ordered to provide health insurance coverage for the child(ren).

Once the administrative child support order is issued, both parties have a right to file with the court to object to the order. 

My ex-spouse has remarried and has another family to support. How will this affect the support that my child is due?

Even though your ex-spouse now has a second family, he/she still has a responsibility to your family. However, if he/she has any additional biological or adopted children with the new family, the amount of support that your ex-spouse pays for your child may be reduced. 

Can the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) help me establish a spousal support order?

No, state law does not authorize the CSEA to establish a spousal support order. You will need a private attorney because only the court may issue a spousal support order. However, the CSEA is responsible for administering spousal support orders, when they are included in child support orders and when they are spousal support-only orders. 

Can a child support order still be issued when the non-custodial parent is in jail or prison?

Yes.

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Medical Support Questions and Answers: 

What is medical support?

Medical support is a requirement in a support order for the obligor to pay a specific amount of money to cover the medical needs of the child or obligee; for the obligor to pay a specific amount of money to the obligee or the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services as reimbursement for a medical expense; for either parent to provide health insurance coverage for the child; and/or for both parents to pay for a certain percentage of the child's remaining medical expenses. 

Will my child support order include medical support?

Yes, Ohio law requires all child support orders to include a cash medical support obligation; an order for one or both parents to provide health insurance coverage for the child; and an order for both parents to share the cost of the child's remaining medical expenses. 

How does the administrative officer or judge decide if a parent is going to be ordered to provide the health insurance coverage for the child in the child support order?

If a parent does not have health insurance available, he/she cannot be ordered to provide health insurance. When neither parent has health insurance available, both parents will be ordered to report any coverage that becomes available to the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) as soon as it is available.

If a parent does have health insurance available, the administrative officer or judge has to make sure the health insurance coverage is reasonable in cost. The insurance is reasonable in cost if the cost of the family plan minus the cost of the single plan is not greater than five percent of the parent's gross income.

For example, if the family plan cost $1500 per year and the single plan cost $1000 per year, then $1500 - $1000 = $500. The parent's gross income is $40,000. Five percent of $40,000 is $2000. The insurance is reasonable in cost because the cost of the family plan minus the cost of the single plan ($500) is not greater than five percent of the parent's gross income ($2000).

If a parent does have health insurance but it is not reasonable in cost, the parent can agree to be ordered to provide the coverage even though it is not reasonable in cost. In addition, if the parent does not agree but the judge believes it is in the child's best interest, the judge may order the parent to provide the coverage even though it is not reasonable in cost. 

What about health insurance coverage through my spouse's job? Does this count as having coverage?

Yes, it does. If a parent in the support order does not have access to heath insurance coverage through his/her employer, but does have access to the coverage through his/her spouse's employer, the parent is considered to have access to health insurance coverage. 

My boss said she got a National Medical Support Notice (NMSN) about me. What is this?

The National Medical Support Notice (NMSN) is a federal form that the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) is required to send to a person's employer when the support order requires the person to provide health insurance coverage for the child. State law also requires the CSEA to send the NMSN to an employer upon receiving a "New Hire" report from the employer.

When health insurance coverage is available to the employee and his/her child, part of the NMSN is sent to the health plan administrator, and the child is enrolled in the coverage. 

The other parent is ordered to provide health insurance coverage for our child, but I provide health insurance coverage for our child with the coverage available through my employer. I want to continue to provide it.  What can I do?

You can continue to provide coverage for your child, even if you are not the person ordered to provide the coverage. However, if you want to receive a credit for the cost of providing the coverage, you will have to request an administrative review. 

What is Cash Medical Support?

Cash medical support is defined as an amount ordered to be paid in a child support order toward the cost of health insurance provided by a public entity, another parent, or person with whom the child resides, through employment or otherwise, or for other medical costs not covered by insurance. 

My child support order says both parents are each supposed to pay 50% for our child's remaining medical expenses. I paid the entire medical bill and now the other parent refuses to reimburse me. What can I do?

You will need to file with the court and ask them to issue a judgment for the other parent to pay you the exact amount of money the other parent owes. For example, if the entire bill was $1000, you need to provide the court with a copy of your child support order and medical bill, and ask the court to issue a judgment for the other parent to pay you $500 in medical support. 

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Child Support Guidelines Questions and Answers:

What are the child support guidelines?

The child support guidelines are the standard method for setting the amount of the child support and cash medical support obligations in the child support order. The guidelines use a mathematical formula based on the combined income of the parents and other factors, such as any social security benefits the child is receiving on behalf of one of the parents. 

Are both parents' income considered when setting support?

Yes. 

Will the guidelines make any adjustments to my support amount if I have other children?

Yes, the guidelines include an adjustment for a biological or adopted child you have from another relationship, as long as the child is living with you. If you receive any child support for another child, that child support amount will also be included in the guidelines calculation. 

Do the guidelines give any credit to the parent who is paying for child care?

Yes, the guidelines provide a credit for the child care expenses for the child in the child support order to the parent that is paying for the child care. 

Do the guidelines give any credit to the parent who has to pay health insurance?

Yes, the parent that is ordered to provide health insurance coverage for the child in the child support order receives a credit for the parent's marginal, out-of-pocket costs of providing the coverage. When both parents are ordered to provide the coverage, both parents receive credit for their marginal, out-of-pocket costs for providing the coverage. 

What if my child is receiving social security benefits on behalf of the obligor?

If the child is receiving social security benefits on behalf of the obligor, and this has not been included in the guidelines, then the obligor should ask for an administrative review and adjustment of the support order to get credit for this amount. The support obligation amount will be reduced by the amount of benefits the child receives on behalf of the obligor. NOTE: If the obligor is disabled and receiving social security benefits and the child is not receiving social security benefits paid on the parent's behalf, contact the social security administration to determine if the child is eligible for benefits. 

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Review and Adjustment of Support Orders Questions and Answers: 

What is the criterion for getting an administrative review of my child support order?

If it has been 36 months since your child support order was issued or modified, you can get an administrative review.

If it has been less than 36 months, you may still be able to get an administrative review based on specific changes of circumstances.  The JFS 01849, "Request for an Administrative Review of the Child Support Order" lists the specific changes of circumstances that qualify a person for an early administrative review. 

I lost my job. Can I get the amount of my child support order changed?

Maybe, if it has been 36 months since your child support order was issued or modified, you can get an administrative review. If it has been less than 36 months, you may still be able to get an administrative review. The reasons for an early review are listed on the JFS 01849, "Request for an Administrative Review of the Child Support Order". 

How do I request an administrative review of my child support amount?

You must complete the JFS 01849, "Request for an Administrative Review of the Child Support Order", sign the form, and submit the form and any supporting documents to your child support enforcement agency (CSEA). When the CSEA receives your request, your caseworker will determine whether your case is eligible for an administrative review. The CSEA will then notify you that your request is approved or denied. 

What types of supporting documents do I have to include with my request for an administrative review?

The JFS 01849, "Request for an Administrative Review of the Child Support Order" includes instructions about the type of evidence a person may have to give to the child support enforcement agency (CSEA), depending on the reason the person is requesting an administrative review. The type of evidence a person may have to provide includes, but is not limited to, documents from an employer, proof of public assistance or unemployment compensation benefits, or a notarized personal statement. Please note that if you are required to provide evidence and you do not, the CSEA may deny your request for an administrative review. 

How long does the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) take to approve or deny my request for an administrative review?

When the CSEA receives your request, the CSEA will determine whether your request is approved or denied within fifteen days. When you are a member of the military and your request is because you have been called to active duty that will last more than 30 days, the CSEA will determine whether your request is approved or denied within three business days. 

What information do I need to provide for the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) to complete the administrative review?

Both parties are required to provide the CSEA with evidence of their income, available health insurance, and any other relevant information necessary to properly review the child support order. Contact your CSEA to find out what specific documents you need to provide. 

How long does the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) have to complete the administrative review?

The CSEA has 180 days (from the date the CSEA received the request) to complete the review and mail the results to both parties.

When the CSEA does not have a valid mailing address for both parties, the CSEA has 180 days from the date the CSEA has a valid mailing address for both parties to complete the review and mail the results to both parties. 

Do I have to attend the administrative review?

No, neither party needs to attend the administrative review. 

What if we (the other party and I) want the review held earlier than the scheduled date?

Once the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) schedules the administrative review, if both parties want the CSEA to complete the review sooner, and the CSEA has the information to complete the review, both parties must sign a waiver for the CSEA to complete an early review. If the CSEA receives signed waivers from both parties, and both parties and the CSEA agree on an early review date, the CSEA will conduct the administrative review on the early review date. However, if the parties and the CSEA do not agree upon an early review date, the CSEA will conduct the administrative review on the originally scheduled date. 

I requested an administrative review and it was approved. What will the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) do if the other party does not provide his/her financial information?

If the non-requesting party fails to provide his/her financial information, the CSEA may contact the person's employer, if known, and request earnings and income information. The CSEA may also impute the party's income, based on available information. The CSEA also has the option of referring the case to the legal unit for contempt proceedings. Please keep in mind that referring a case for legal action is usually the last option of the CSEA. 

How will I find out the results of the administrative review?

After the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) conducts the administrative review, the CSEA mails the administrative review recommendations to both parties. 

I have a court child support order. How do I object to the child support enforcement agency's (CSEA's) administrative review recommendations?

You need to submit a written request for an administrative adjustment hearing to the CSEA. Because your support order is a court order, the request must be received by the CSEA within 14 days of the date you received the administrative review recommendation.  (State law determines the 14 day time-frame.) 

I have an administrative child support order. How do I object to the child support enforcement agency's (CSEA's) administrative review recommendations?

You need to submit a written request for an administrative adjustment hearing to the CSEA. Because your support order is an administrative child support order, the request must be received by the CSEA within 30 days of the date you received the administrative review recommendation. (State law determines the 30 day time-frame.) 

What happens if neither party objects to the administrative adjustment review recommendations and the support order is a court child support order?

If neither party objects to the administrative adjustment review recommendations, the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) will forward the recommendations and all documentation to the court. Once the court signs and file-stamps the amended child support order, the court will send a copy of the amended order to the CSEA. When the CSEA receives the amended support order, the CSEA will update any new support obligation amounts in the Support Enforcement Tracking System. 

What happens if neither party objects to the administrative adjustment review recommendations and the order is an administrative child support order?

If neither party objects to the administrative adjustment review recommendations, the recommendations will become part of the amended child support order and any new support obligation amounts will take effect on the first of the month following the review date that is listed on the administrative adjustment review recommendations. 

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Child Support Enforcement Questions and Answers: 

Is the child support enforcement agency required to enforce my temporary support order?

Yes. 

Can I still receive child support if the obligor has filed bankruptcy?

Yes, but there are certain enforcement techniques the child support enforcement agency cannot take against the obligor until the bankruptcy filing is discharged. 

My support order is for spousal support. Can the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) still enforce my case?

Yes, the CSEA provides enforcement services for a spousal support-only order. However, there are some enforcement techniques that the CSEA can only provide on a spousal support order when the order is part of a support order that includes both child support and spousal support. 

Can child support be collected from an incarcerated obligor?

Yes. 

If an obligor receives benefits from the Social Security Administration, will these benefits be garnished to pay the obligor's support order?

Maybe, it depends on what type of benefits the obligor receives from the Social Security Administration. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) cannot be garnished to pay an obligor's support order. Social Security Disability (SSD) and Social Security Retirement (SSR) benefits can be garnished to pay an obligor's support order. The amount of support that can be garnished from the Social Security benefits is limited by the federal Consumer Credit Protection Act. If the obligor is receiving SSD or SSR benefits and the child is not, contact the Social Security Administration to find out if the child qualifies for receiving benefits as the obligor's dependent. 

I receive benefits each month from the Veteran's Administration (VA). Can they take money out of my VA check for child support?

It depends on the type of VA benefits you receive. The child support enforcement agency will have to send an income withholding notice to the VA. The VA will then have to determine whether your benefits can be garnished for support. If the obligor is receiving VA benefits and the child is not, contact the VA to find out if the child qualifies for receiving benefits as the obligor's dependent. 

I am an obligor. Can the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) take my bonus or lump sum payment?

Yes, if you owe arrears. Ohio law requires employers to notify the CSEA when an employee (including an independent contractor) is going to get a bonus or lump sum payment of $150 or more. If the obligor owes arrears, the CSEA must take action so that the money is sent to Child Support Payment Central and applied to the support obligation. 

What is a seek work order?

When an obligor has no income, no bank account, and no job, but is able to work, the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) or court may issue a "seek work order." The order requires the obligor to try to get a job or to enroll in a public assistance job readiness program, and to immediately notify the CSEA if the obligor gets a job or gets cash or assets worth $500. 

What is the "Most Wanted Poster" program?

Twice a year, the Office of Child Support (OCS) publishes Ohio's Most Wanted Poster, with the name and picture of ten obligors that the child support enforcement agencies (CSEAs) have been unable to locate. The obligor's case must meet specific criteria in order for the obligor to be on the poster. OCS' toll-free number is on the poster for people to call and provide location tips. Some CSEAs also publish their own Most Wanted Poster, using the same criteria as OCS and putting the CSEA's toll-free number on the poster. 

What does it mean when the obligor is in "default"?

For child support purposes, "default" means an obligor did not pay support when it was due. If the obligor goes into default (more than one month's support is due and has not been paid), a "Notice to Obligor of Default and Potential Action" is sent, informing the obligor of the enforcement techniques that may be used to ensure compliance. Some enforcement techniques are only used once an obligor is in default. 

I paid all of my support arrears in full but my credit report still shows the child support account. Why?

The credit reporting company will keep the case in its records for seven years from the date of delinquency. 

Can the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) suspend my driver's license?

Yes, a CSEA can suspend an obligor's driver's license if the obligor is in default. 

The child support enforcement agency (CSEA) suspended my driver's license. How do I get the hold lifted?

If the CSEA suspended your driver's license, you need to contact the CSEA to find out what specific action you must take to get your license reinstated. The types of actions an obligor may have to take to get a driver's license reinstated include: paying off all of the arrears; providing information (for example, a new employer) so that an income withholding order is issued to collect support; having a new or modified child support order issued; cooperating so that a warrant is removed; and complying with a subpoena. 

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Termination of a Support Order Questions and Answers: 

What are the reasons a child support order must terminate?

A child support order should be terminated when:

  • The child gets married, is emancipated, enlists full-time in the military, dies, or is adopted.
  • There is a change in the child's legal custody.
  • The child is 18 and no longer attends an accredited high school full-time.
  • The child is 19 and the court support order does not require the support order to continue beyond the child's 19th birthday.
  • The obligor or obligee is a grandparent and there is a change in the status of the child or the child's parent.

What is the age of majority?

In Ohio, the age of majority is 18. Please be aware that a court or administrative child support order can continue to age 19 if the child is attending an accredited high school full-time and a court support order may require a support order to continue beyond the child's 19th birthday due to specific facts and circumstances as documented on the court support order. 

Who is responsible for notifying the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) that the child support order needs to be terminated?

The custodial parent is required to notify the CSEA of any reason why the child support order should terminate. The non-custodial parent may also notify the CSEA of any reason why the child support order should be terminated. 

My case is overpaid. Is there a way that I can get this money back?

If a child support order has been terminated and a court or administrative order has established that the obligee received an overpayment of at least $150.00, the child support enforcement agency may be able to submit the obligee to the Ohio Department of Taxation for state tax offset.

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Employer Questions and Answers: 

What is the definition of an "employee"?

"Employee" means an individual who is employed to provide services to an employer for compensation that is reported as income from wages. "Employee" does not include an individual performing intelligence or counterintelligence functions for a state agency, if the head of the agency has determined that reporting pursuant to this section could endanger the safety of the employee or compromise an ongoing investigation or intelligence mission. (Ohio Revised Code §3121.89) 

What is the definition of a "contractor"?

"Contractor" means an individual who provides services to an employer as an independent contractor for compensation that is reported as income other than wages and who is an individual, the sole shareholder of a corporation, or the sole member of a limited liability company. "Contractor" does not include any of the following:

  • An individual performing intelligence or counterintelligence functions for a state agency if the head of the agency has determined that reporting pursuant to this section could endanger the safety of the individual or compromise an ongoing investigation or intelligence mission;
  • A professionally licensed person who is providing services to the employer under that license; or
  • An individual who will receive for the services provided under the contract compensation of less than two thousand five hundred dollars per year. (Ohio Revised Code §3121.89)

What is the definition of "employer"?

"Employer" means any person or government entity other than the federal government for which an individual performs any service, of whatever nature, as the employee or contractor of such person, except that:

  • If the person for whom the individual performs services does not have control of the payment of compensation for the services, employer means the person having control of the payment of the compensation.
  • In the case of a person paying compensation on behalf of a nonresident alien individual, foreign partnership, or foreign corporation not engaged in trade or business within the United States, "employer" means the person paying the compensation.
  • In the case of compensation paid to a contractor, "employer" does not include any person or entity that lacks a federal employer identification number. (Ohio Revised Code §3121.89)

Who should an employer report as a new hire?

Every employer must make a new hire report to the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services regarding the hiring, rehiring, or return to work as an employee, or contractor, of a person who resides, works, or will be assigned to work in Ohio to whom the employer anticipates paying compensation. For further clarification and additional information, visit the website for new hire at: www.oh-newhire.com or call: 1-888-872-1490. 

What if an employer fails to submit a New Hire report?

An employer that fails to make a New Hire report shall be liable to the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services for a civil penalty of twenty-five dollars for each failure to make a New Hire report. If the failure to make a New Hire report is the result of a conspiracy between the employer and the employee not to supply the report or to supply a false or incomplete report, the employer shall be liable for a civil penalty of five hundred dollars for each such failure. 

Can child support be withheld from Federal Work Study grants?

No, Federal Work Study grants from the U.S. Department of Education are exempt from child support withholding. 

Can commissions be garnished through income withholding for child support?

Yes, payments of commissions are considered income and can be garnished by income withholding. 

When must an employer begin income withholding?

Ohio law requires the employer to begin the income withholding no later than the first pay period occurring 14 days after the date of the income withholding notice and to remit the payment within seven business days of the pay date or date of withholding. 

Can the child support enforcement agency take legal action against an employer that does not comply with an income withholding order?

Yes.

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Child Support Payment Central - Making Payments Questions and Answers: 

How do I make a child support payment?

  • You can make a support payment online at www.expertpay.com.
  • You can make a support payment in person at your county child support enforcement agency (CSEA) if your CSEA accepts payments in-person. Contact your CSEA to find out if they offer this service.
  • You can mail a support payment to Ohio CSPC at the below address. If you mail a support payment, you must include your name, social security number, order number, and case number with your payment.

Please make your payment payable to Ohio CSPC at: 

Ohio CSPC
P.O. Box 182372
Columbus, OH  43218-2372 

Can I make my support payment with a personal check?

Ohio CSPC accepts personal checks up to $20,000. If your support payment is for more than $20,000, you must send a certified check. 

Can I make a payment to my support case over the phone?

Currently you cannot make a support payment over the phone. Please see the "Child Support Payment Central" overview page for additional information on how to make support payments. 

I am an employer. Where do I mail my employees' support payments?

Mail your employees' support payments to Ohio CSPC at the below address. You must include your employees' names, social security numbers, order numbers, and case numbers with your payment. You must also include what amount of the payment to apply to each case. Please make your payment payable to Ohio CSPC at: 

Ohio CSPC     
P.O. Box 182394
Columbus, OH  43218-2394 

I have a recoupment account. Where do I send my recoupment payment?

Mail your recoupment account payment to Ohio CSPC at the below address. You must include your name, social security number, order number, case number, and recoupment account number with your payment. Please make your payment payable to Ohio CSPC at: 

Ohio CSPC 
P.O. Box 182380
Columbus, OH  43218-2380 

I received a letter from Child Support Payment Central (CSPC) about a returned deposit item (RDI). Why did I receive it?

If you received an RDI letter, then CSPC received notification from your bank that one of your checks was returned unpaid. You must make good on this check and pay any associated fees. For specific information on your returned check, please contact CSPC Customer Support at 1-888-965-2676. 

The payment I sent to Child Support Payment Central (CSPC) was rejected and returned to me. Why?

There are several possible reasons CSPC was not able to process your payment. Common reasons include:

  • The check is pre-dated or post-dated.
  • The check is not signed.
  • The amount in the "courtesy box" is different from the amount written on the "legal line."
  • The payment is not made payable to Ohio CSPC.
  • You previously submitted a check to CSPC that was returned unpaid and you are now required to submit payments via certified funds such as a money order or cashier's check.

You should have received a letter explaining why CSPC returned your payment. If you have questions about your letter, please contact CSPC Customer Support at 1-888-965-2676.

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Child Support Payment Central - Receiving Payments Questions and Answers:

Can I have my child support payments deposited into a foreign bank account?

No, you cannot have your support direct deposited into an account with a foreign bank or financial institution. However, many U.S. financial institutions provide a means for banking over the internet. You can set up an account using the internet with a U.S. financial institution and access your funds online. Furthermore, you may enroll in the e-QuickPay program, as MasterCard is recognized worldwide and many foreign financial institutions do not charge ATM fees. 

Why is my support payment less than the amount that was received on my case?

If the full amount of support owed to you has been paid for the month, any funds that come in during the remainder of the month may be applied to any outstanding fees, which may not be owed to you. 

Why is it taking so long for the obligor's employer to send in my support payment?

An employer has seven business days from the date the employee is paid to forward a payment to Ohio CSPC. Once CSPC receives a support payment, it is processed and issued within 48 hours. Depending on your method of disbursement, CSPC issues the payment via mail, to your Ohio e-QuickPay card, or to your bank account. You must allow time for the payment to be received in the mail, loaded on your e-QuickPay card, or processed by your bank. 

What is Direct Deposit?

With Direct Deposit, your support payments are deposited directly to your bank account. If you receive your support payments through direct deposit, please allow two to three business days for funds to show in your account. Your bank statements will provide you with a record of your support deposits. 

I am a custodial parent and I use direct deposit. Once a support payment is received, how long will it take to appear in my account?

Ohio CSPC sends an electronic funds transfer to the U.S. Federal Reserve within two business days of processing your support payment. The Federal Reserve then electronically sends the funds to your bank. Your bank deposits the funds into your account and determines when the funds are available to you, according to the bank's policies and procedures. 

What is the e-Quick Pay Card?

The Ohio e-QuickPay Debit MasterCard is a debit card you may use to receive support payments. Once a support payment is posted to your case, the payment is credited to your e-Quick Pay card by midnight on the next business day. To get an e-Quick Pay card, you do not need to have a bank account. The card may be used any place that accepts MasterCard debit cards or Maestro. Cash withdrawals from the card can be made at any ATM or bank teller window displaying the MasterCard, Maestro, or Cirrus brand marks. 

Does it say "child support" on the e-QuickPay card? Will people know I receive child support when they see me use my card?

No, the words "Child Support" are not on the e-QuickPay card. 

How do I enroll in e-QuickPay or Direct Deposit?

Please go to the "Child Support Payment Central" overview page for enrollment information. 

How long does it take for my e-QuickPay or Direct Deposit enrollment to complete?

It can take up to three weeks to process your e-QuickPay or Direct Deposit enrollment; however, most enrollments are completed much quicker. You will receive a letter if there is a problem with your enrollment. To check the status of your enrollment, contact CSPC Customer Support at 1-888-965-2676. 

Why did I receive an e-QuickPay card when I enrolled in Direct Deposit?

There are two possible reasons for this:

  • You were previously enrolled in the Ohio e-QuickPay program and had a remaining balance on your card when you changed to Direct Deposit.  The card you received may be a replacement card. Please activate the card and check the balance.
  • You recently enrolled in Direct Deposit because you received a "Final Notice" for enrollment, and CSPC was already in the process of enrolling you in the Ohio e-QuickPay program before receiving your enrollment form. Please contact CSPC Customer Support at 1-888-965-2676 to verify they received your Direct Deposit enrollment form.

Does the State have the ability to view transactions on my e-QuickPay card or my bank account?

No, the state and county child support enforcement agency have no ability to view transactions on your e-QuickPay card or bank account.

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Child Support Payment Central - e-Quick Pay Card Questions and Answers: 

What is the website for the Ohio e-QuickPay card?

Please visit: www.e-quickpay.com

When will my payment be available on my e-QuickPay card?

Funds are loaded on your e-QuickPay card by midnight of the business day following the day a payment was posted to your case.  For example, if a payment was posted to your case on Monday, funds will be loaded on your card by midnight on Tuesday. 

Why isn't my payment on my e-QuickPay card?

Funds are loaded on your e-QuickPay card by midnight of the business day following the day a payment was posted to your case. If a payment was posted to your case but it is not on your card, contact your county child support enforcement agency. 

How can I check the balance on my e-QuickPay card?

There are several ways to check the balance on your e-QuickPay card: 

  • Please visit: www.e-quickpay.com.
  • Call e-QuickPay Customer Service at 1-800-503-1283.
  • Go to an Automatic Teller Machine (ATM). You will be charged a balance inquiry fee of $.40 each time you check your balance from an ATM.  Some ATMs also apply a transaction surcharge. Surcharges generally range from $1.25 - $3.00 and are charged in addition to the balance inquiry fee. ATMs that apply a surcharge warn you that a surcharge will be applied before you complete your transaction. You may cancel the transaction if you do not want to pay the surcharge. Fifth Third Bank, PNC and Alliance One have agreed to waive their ATM surcharge fee for all Ohio e-QuickPay transactions.

How do I reset the PIN for my e-QuickPay card?

You may reset your PIN by calling e-QuickPay Customer Service at 1-800-503-1283. This number is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 

I tried to call the e-QuickPay Customer Support line and cannot get my balances and cannot figure out how to talk to a live person.  Are there any shortcuts?

Yes, if you do not enter any selection after hearing the initial prompts, you will be connected to a customer service representative. 

How do I update my last name on my e-QuickPay card?

If your name has recently changed, follow all of the following steps to have a new e-QuickPay card issued with your new name:

  • Contact you county child support enforcement agency and report your name change.
  • Contact CSPC Customer Support at 1-888-965-2676 to have your name changed in the Ohio e-QuickPay card system.
  • Contact e-QuickPay Customer Service at 1-800-503-1283 to have a new card issued.

I moved.  What should I do to make sure I get my e-QuickPay card or any information or letters pertaining to my account?

You must report your change of address to e-QuickPay Customer Service at 1-800-503-1283 and to your county child support enforcement agency. 

When making a purchase with my e-QuickPay card, should I choose "CREDIT" or "DEBIT" after swiping my card?

The only difference between pressing CREDIT and DEBIT is pressing the CREDIT button will require your signature, and pressing DEBIT will require you to enter your PIN. 

If I return merchandise I purchased with my e-QuickPay card, how will I be credited?

It depends on the merchant. Typically, the funds will be credited back to your e-QuickPay account, you will receive cash back, or you will receive a store credit to be used for future purchases. 

What is the service charge for using the ATM to withdraw funds from my e-QuickPay card?

There is a $0.75 fee for ATM withdrawals and a $0.40 fee for balance inquiries. Some ATMs will impose additional surcharges. Fifth Third, PNC and Alliance One ATMs will not impose the additional surcharges, but the $0.75 and $0.40 fees will still apply. 

NOTE: If you check your card balance and there are no funds on the card you will be charged a balance inquiry fee and this may result in a negative balance. Your negative balance will be offset when a payment is credited to your account. 

To avoid any charges visit the e-QuickPay website at www.e-quickpay.com or call 1-800-503-1283 to check your available balance. 

My e-QuickPay card was lost or stolen. What do I do?

Contact e-QuickPay Customer Service at 1-800-503-1283 immediately. Make certain you let the customer service representative know that you are calling about a lost or stolen card. Notifying customer service makes your card invalid for any future use for purchases or attempts to get cash. This protects your funds in the account. 

Remember calling and canceling the card does not close out the account. You may still receive payments on your account even though your card may be canceled. Your e-QuickPay account number is not the same as your e-QuickPay card number. Therefore, if your card is lost or stolen, it can be deactivated and no one will be able to access your funds. Your new card will have a different card number but it will still access your same account. 

My card was stolen and has been used by someone else. Am I responsible for all the money they used?

You may be held liable for the first $50 that was used from your funds. You need to contact e-QuickPay Customer Service at 1-800-503-1283 immediately.

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Child Support Payment Central - Expired e-Quick Pay Card Questions and Answers:

Where do I find my card's expiration date?

Ohio e-QuickPay debit cards contain a "Valid Thru" date located on the front of the card listed just above your name. This is your card's expiration date. 

When will my card expire?

The "Valid Thru" date on the front of your card lists the month and year your card will expire. Your card will be valid through the last day of that month. For example, if your card says "Valid Thru 06/2012" your card will be valid through June 30, 2012. 

Why does my card have an expiration date?

Debit cards contain a magnetic stripe that over time can become worn, as can the card itself through regular use. e-QuickPay debit cards have an expiration date of three years in order to keep your card in good working condition. 

What happens after the "Valid Thru" (expiration) date?

The expired card will not be accepted at financial institutions, ATMs, or merchants after this date. 

Do I have to request a replacement card if my e-QuickPay card is expiring?

No, e-QuickPay customer service will automatically mail you a new card with an updated "Valid Thru" date. If you have moved please make sure your county child support enforcement agency has your new address because the card cannot be forwarded. 

Will I be charged for the expiring card's replacement?

No. 

When will the e-QuickPay replacement card arrive?

You should receive your new card around the first part of the month the card is due to expire. If you have not received it by the 20th day of that month please contact e-QuickPay Customer Service at 1-800-503-1283. 

What should I do when my e-QuickPay renewal card arrives?

You will need to select a PIN for your renewal card in order to activate it. Follow the instructions enclosed with the card. The expiring card will no longer be usable once the renewal card is activated. 

Can I use the same PIN with my e-QuickPay renewal card?

Yes, you can use the same PIN. You must still follow the instructions enclosed with the card to activate it. 

Will my renewal card have the same card number?

No, the renewal card will have a different card number. 

What happens to funds on my expiring card?

Your support payments are maintained in an account and are not tied to a specific card. Any remaining funds that you accessed with your expiring card may automatically be accessed with your renewal card.

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Interstate/Intergovernmental Case Questions and Answers:

Can paternity be established and/or a child support order be established and enforced if the other parent lives in a different state?

Yes, you should contact your county child support enforcement agency. They will be able to help you based on your specific situation. 

The other person in my case lives in a foreign country. Is there anything I can do to get child support?

Maybe, child support enforcement agencies (CSEAs) work with countries all over the world. Please contact your county CSEA for more information. 

If my child support case is from another state, how do I ask for a review of my support order?

There are a number of factors that determine where the review should actually be conducted.  You should request a review in writing from your local child support enforcement agency. 

My case is in another state. Do I have to travel to that state for hearings?

No, if your local child support enforcement agency (CSEA) is working together with the child support agency in the other state on your case, then interstate law prohibits that state from requiring you to travel there for hearings. However, if you want to have a telephone hearing with the other state, you may ask your local CSEA to set this up. 

I just moved to Ohio but my child support case is still in my old state. Do I have to open a new child support case in Ohio?

No, if you choose, you may simply continue to work with the child support agency in the other state. 

How long will it take to start receiving support payments if there is a child support order and the child support enforcement agency (CSEA) knows where the obligor is working but the job is in another state?

It depends, as the CSEA may be able to send an income withholding notice directly to the obligor's employer. If the CSEA is working with the child support agency in another state, the CSEA will tell the other agency where the obligor is working and that state will send the income withholding notice. 

Why does Ohio have to work with the child support agency in another state to start collecting payments on my child support case?

Sometimes the county child support enforcement agency (CSEA) in Ohio has to work with the child support agency in another state in order to enforce a child support order and start collecting support payments. For additional information, please discuss your specific case circumstances with your county CSEA. 

I have a support order from another state in which the obligor is not paying or complying and I am now residing in Ohio.  What can be done?

You can contact the county child support enforcement agency (CSEA) in the Ohio County where you live. The CSEA will work with the other state to enforce your support order.

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Ohio Department of Taxation State Tax Offset Program Questions and Answers:

I am the obligee on a child support case; will the obligor have his/her Ohio state tax refund taken?

Maybe, an obligor may be submitted for Ohio Department of Taxation (ODT) tax offset if: the case is a "IV-D case"; neither the obligor nor the obligor's spouse filed for bankruptcy before October 17, 2005; and the total support arrears are at least $150. The age of the child is not a factor. The arrears eligible for offset include child support, spousal support for the parent with whom the child is living, and medical support. 

I am an obligor and I had my Ohio state tax refund taken. When will I get credit for this payment on my child support case?

It depends on whether you filed a single tax return or a joint tax return. 

If you filed a single tax return, the Ohio Department of Taxation (ODT) will send you an offset notice about the intercept. It takes approximately four to six weeks from the date ODT sent the offset notice to process the refund as a support payment. This is because all tax money must be processed through several state fiscal agencies before being applied to your arrears. 

If you filed a joint return, ODT will send you and the joint tax filer an offset notice about the intercept. The joint tax filer then has 21 days to request his/her share of the tax refund back from ODT. If the joint tax filer does not request his/her share of the refund, it takes approximately four to eight weeks to process the refund as a support payment. If the joint tax filer does request his/her share of the refund, ODT sends the joint tax filer his/her share of the refund. The remaining amount of the refund is then processed as a support payment. 

I am the obligee on the case, but my Ohio state tax refund was taken for child support. Why did this happen?

Once the support order is terminated, if the obligee received an overpayment (more support than what was due), the obligee's Ohio state tax refund may be offset to repay the overpayment. 

I am an obligor who has overpaid my child support. Can I get the overpayment back from the obligee?

Maybe, as Ohio law authorizes an obligee to be submitted to the Ohio Department of Taxation (ODT) Obligee State Tax Offset Program if the obligee received an overpayment of at least $150 when the child support order is terminated. You need to contact your county child support enforcement agency to see if your case qualifies. 

Please note that an obligee may not be submitted to the ODT Obligee State Tax Offset Program if the child support order is still active. In addition, an obligee may not be submitted for a federal tax offset.

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Internal Revenue Service Federal Tax Offset Program Questions and Answers:

What are the submission criteria for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) federal tax offset?

In order for an obligor to be submitted for IRS federal tax offset, the case must be a "IV-D case" and the arrears must be for child support; spousal support, if it is included as part of child support order; or medical support. In addition, if the arrears are assigned (owed) to the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, the balance must be at least $150. If the arrears are owed to the obligee, the balance must be at least $500. The age of the child is not a factor. 

The obligor cannot be submitted if bankruptcy was filed on or before October 17, 2005 and is stil in effect. Once that bankruptcy has been discharged the obligor can be submitted for IRS federal tax offset. The initiating state is the state who submits the obligor for IRS federal tax offset in an interstate case situation. 

Did the obligor file a federal tax return?

The child support enforcement agency does not have this information. Due to federal confidentiality laws, the Internal Revenue Service cannot disclose information regarding taxpayers, such as a taxpayer's address and if the taxpayer filed a return. 

Has the obligor's federal tax refund been offset?

Not necessarily. Although an obligor may be submitted for tax offset, funds can be collected only if the obligor files an income tax return, is eligible to receive a refund, and does not owe some other debt that supersedes child support from intercepting the refund. 

Why is my federal tax refund being held for six months?

Per federal law, in cases where an Internal Revenue Service (IRS) federal tax return has been filed as a joint return, the State of Ohio may hold the funds for six months. This is in case the IRS makes a downward adjustment (reduces) to the refund amount. 

I am an obligor and I had my federal tax refund taken. When will I get credit for this payment on my child support case?

The entire process from when an obligor's federal tax refund is intercepted to the completion of in-state processing takes approximately six to eight weeks. 

When an obligor's federal tax refund is intercepted, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) forwards the person's name, social security number, and refund amount to the federal Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE). OCSE collects the refund and sends it to the State of Ohio. Each state fiscal agency is notified of the intercept in order to complete their internal accounting procedures. Once each agency has completed their portion of the financial process, the refund is sent to the Office of Child Support's Master Account for processing on each individual child support case. 

What is a federal tax refund offset adjustment?

A federal tax refund offset adjustment is when the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) previously sent an obligor's federal tax refund to Ohio to apply to the obligor's support arrears and now the IRS is asking to have that money returned to their agency. 

A federal tax refund offset adjustment can occur for many different reasons, but the most common reason is the obligor filed a joint return and the joint filer filed a claim with the IRS to receive his/her share of the federal tax refund. 

If the obligor filed a joint federal tax return, the joint filer may file an Injured Spouse Claim with the IRS to receive his/her share of the joint federal tax refund. If the IRS determines that all or part of the refund does belong to the joint filer, the IRS will immediately issue the joint filer his/her share of the refund, even if the entire refund has already been offset and applied to the obligor's arrears. The IRS will then collect that same amount back from the State of Ohio. 

If there is a federal tax refund offset adjustment and the money was already sent to the obligee, the child support enforcement agency may contact the obligee to have the money returned to the State of Ohio or require the obligor repay this money to the State of Ohio. 

Does the Office of Child Support (OCS) collect interest on federal tax refunds?

No, the OCS master account is a non-interest bearing account. Therefore, there is no interest, collected or paid, from holding a tax refund for any period of time. 

Why can't the child support enforcement agency get the obligor's address from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS)?

Due to federal confidentiality laws, the IRS cannot disclose information regarding taxpayers, such as a taxpayer's address and if the taxpayer filed a return. 

Can the obligor claim the child as a dependent on his/her taxes?

The decision of whether anyone can claim the child on his/her taxes is outside the jurisdiction of the Child Support program and we are not authorized to answer such tax-related questions. You may wish to consult with an attorney, a tax preparer or other tax expert regarding these concerns. 

Why won't the child support agency provide me information regarding the obligor's tax refund?

A child support enforcement agency (CSEA) has a duty to protect federal tax information the CSEA receives from the Internal Revenue Service. This is particularly true if you are contacting the CSEA by phone. There are both criminal and civil penalties for the unauthorized disclosure of federal tax information.

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Passport Denial Program Questions and Answers:

Why was my Passport denied?

An obligor's passport is denied when the obligor owes at least $2,500 in arrears for child support, spousal support for the parent with whom the child is living, or medical support. 

When an obligor has been submitted for the Passport Denial Program and applies for a passport the Department of State issues the obligor a Denial Notice that the passport is denied related to child support reasons. 

If my passport has been denied, how do I get it back?

You must contact your county child support enforcement agency (CSEA) to request reinstatement of the passport. If more than one CSEA is involved, you must request passport reinstatement from each CSEA. 

If you need the passport for business travel, you will have to give the CSEA documentation that confirms that you need the passport for work, and will have to make a lump sum payment on your arrears. 

If you need the passport for vacation or other leisure travel, you will have to pay all of your arrears before your passport can be reinstated. 

If you need the passport for a family emergency or for Military travel, you will have to give the CSEA documentation that confirms the reason you need the passport, and may be eligible for an expedited passport release. 

You must contact your CSEA to find out what specific actions you must take on your case for your passport to be reinstated. 

Once my denied passport is released by my child support enforcement agency, how long will it take to receive the newly valid passport?

The reason you need your passport will determine how long the release process will take at the county, state, and federal levels. 

If you need the passport for a family emergency or for Military travel, the release process will take approximately one week once the CSEA forwards the release to the state Office of Child Support (OCS).  When OCS has the necessary documentation to expedite the passport denial release process, OCS sends the release form to the federal Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) and OCSE contacts the United States Department of State (DoS).  DoS is responsible for processing the release with all passport service issuing agencies.  You should then wait at least three business days before contacting your passport service issuing agency. Your local congressperson's office may be able to provide further assistance in expediting the release process if any issues still exist. 

If you need the passport for business travel, the release will take approximately one to three weeks once OCS forwards the information to the federal level.  You need to wait at least one week before contacting your passport service issuing agency. Your local congressperson's office may be able to provide further assistance if your passport is not released at the federal level after three weeks. 

If you need the passport for leisure travel, the release will take approximately six to eight weeks once OCS forwards the information to the federal level.  You need to wait at least six weeks before contacting your passport service issuing agency. Your local congressperson's office may be able to provide further assistance if your passport is not released at the federal level after eight weeks.

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Child Support Customer Service Portal - Registration and Login Questions and Answers:

What should I do if I don't have an email address?

Check with your internet provider, or go to a free email service provider such as Hotmail or Yahoo and register for a free email address.

Why do I need an email address?

An email address is needed to receive portal registration confirmation and for communication purposes in the event you forget your User ID or password.

NOTE: Your forgotten User ID and /or the link to reset your password will be sent to your email address provided during registration. Therefore, it is important to keep your registered email address on the Customer Service Portal current.

What should I do if my email address has changed?

If your email address has changed, login to your Customer Service Portal account and after logging in, on the left hand side of the screen, click the "Has your email address changed" link. This will take you to the "Change Email Address" page. Enter your new email address and click "Submit".

What happens if I forget my User ID?

  1. On the login page, click on the "If you forgot your User ID, Click Here" link.
  2. After typing the image displaying on the screen and clicking "Submit", enter your email address on the "Forgot User ID" page and click "Submit".
  3. An email will be sent to your registered email account containing your User ID and a link to return to the login page.

What happens if I forget my password? 
 
1.  On the Login page, click on the "If you forgot your password or if your account is locked Click Here" link.
2.  After typing the image displaying on the screen and clicking "Submit", enter your User ID on the "Forgot Password" page and click "Submit". 
3.  An email will be sent to your registered email account containing a link to reset your password. Click on the link. NOTE: The link to reset your password must be accessed within 48 hours or it will no longer be valid and the password reset process will have to be started over again. 
4.  On the "Change Password" page, enter a new password in the "Enter your new password" and "Re-enter your new password" fields and click "Submit".

5. An email will be sent to your registered email account confirming the password change.

What should I do if I did not receive the expected email from the Customer Service Portal?

Try one or more of the following solutions:

1.    Search your spam, junk and bulk email folders for the email from the Customer Service Portal email address: <DoNotReply@childsupport.ohio.gov>. Sometimes instead of being delivered to your inbox, emails get delivered to one of these folders. If found, select the Customer Service Portal email and click "Not Spam", "Not Junk" or any similar button identified in your email program. This will ensure the delivery of all future Customer Service Portal emails to your inbox.
2.  Add the Customer Service Portal email address: <DoNotReply@childsupport.ohio.gov> to your address book or safe senders list.

3.  Verify your email: 

  • If you are able to login into the portal, on the left hand side of the screen, click the "Has your email address changed" link. This will take you to the "Change Email Address" page. Verify the Customer Service Portal has your correct email address. If the portal does not have your correct email address, enter your correct email address and click "Submit". 
  • If you have forgotten your User ID and therefore cannot log into the portal, to change your email and obtain the forgotten User ID, click on the "If you forgot your User ID" link.
  • If you have forgotten your Password and therefore cannot log into the portal, to change your email and reset your password, click on the "If you forgot your password or your account is locked" link.

After several failed attempts to log in, I have been locked out. What do I need to do?

For user security, after five invalid password attempts, a user is automatically locked out of the portal. If after 36 hours no action has been taken by the user to unlock their account, the user's lock out is automatically reset. For immediate access, on the login page, click the "If you forgot your password or if your Account is locked" link. By entering your User ID and following the instructions in the email generated to you, you will be able to change your password and again have access to your account.

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Customer Service Portal Personal Information Questions and Answers

Do I have to report my address to the Child Support office when I move? 

Yes, pursuant to Ohio Revised Code section 3121.29, each party to the support order MUST notify the child support enforcement agency in writing of HIS OR HER current mailing address, current residence address, current residence telephone number, current driver's license number, and of any changes in that information.

What is the difference between a residential address and a mailing address? 

The residential address is the location where the individual physically resides. If the individual receives their mail in another location besides where they physically reside (for example, post office box), this is the mailing address.

I notified my caseworker that I have a temporary address change. The temporary address that I reported is not displaying in the Customer Service Portal, should I notify my caseworker? 

If you have reported a temporary address directly to your caseworker, the temporary address will not display in the Customer Service Portal. Future updates to the Customer Service Portal will allow registered users to update their residential or mailing address information electronically via the portal as needed eliminating the need to identify a "temporary" address.

Will the other party on my case have access to my address through the Customer Service Portal? 

No, the Customer Service Portal will provide child support customers with 24/7 password-protected access to case specific information. As long as your user ID and password are not shared, no one else should have access to your personal information.

How may I update my mailing and e-mail addresses, employer, telephone number and cell numbers? 

At this time, if you wish to change your personal information, you should contact your local Child Support Enforcement Agency.
*NOTE: Watch for future updates to the Customer Service Portal which will allow registered users to update this information electronically via the portal.

What do I do if the employer displaying is not my current employer? 

The Customer Service Portal will display what our system shows as the most recent employer information. When you select the dropdown button the name(s) of any additional employers that we show for you in our system will display. When one of these additional employer names is selected, the screen will refresh to display all of the information for that employer. If you do not see your employer listed or if you are no longer employed by any of the employers listed, you should contact your local Child Support Enforcement Agency to report the information. *NOTE: Watch for future updates to the Customer Service Portal which will allow registered users to update this information electronically via the portal.

I am the obligor on my case; what employment notification(s) am I required to provide?

You are required to provide written notification of any of the following:

1. Any change in your income source and of the availability of any other sources of income that can be subject to withholding or deduction.
2. The name, business address and telephone number of a new employer or source of income.
3. Any change in status of an account from which support is being deducted or the opening of a new account with any financial institution, beginning new employment (including self employment) or the availability of any other source of income that can be subject to withholding or deduction.
4. The name and business address of a financial institution when a new account is opened.
5. Any other information reasonably required by the court or child support enforcement agency.
*NOTE: Watch for future updates to the Customer Service Portal which will allow registered users to update this information electronically via the portal.

What do I do if the insurance information displaying in the portal is not correct or current?

At this time, if you wish to change your personal information, you should contact your local Child Support Enforcement Agency.
*NOTE: Future updates to the Customer Service Portal will allow registered users to update their information electronically via the portal.

Why does the Customer Service Portal only show one insurance policy when I have more than one policy that I have reported to my local CSEA? 

The Customer Service Portal will display the most recent insurance policy information. When you select the dropdown button the name(s) of any additional insurance providers that we show for you in our system will display. When one of these additional insurance provider names is selected, the screen will refresh to display all of the insurance information for that provider. If you do not see one of your insurance providers listed, you should contact your local Child Support Enforcement Agency. *NOTE: Future updates to the Customer Service Portal will allow registered users to update their information electronically via the portal. 

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Last Updated 09/30/2013